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Qualifying for Taking the PMP Exam

Qualifying for Taking the PMP Exam  Are you hoping to receive your PMP® certification to take your project management career to the next level? Well, in order to do that, you need to take and pass the PMP® exam. And, to be totally prepared to do that, you can enroll in our PMP® exam prep courses.  But, before you can even sign up to take this exam, you need to meet certain qualifications. Below is a short guide to the qualifications that need to be met before you can take the PMP® exam and get your certification.  Eligibility To qualify to take the PMP® Exam, you must have a secondary degree, along with 7,500 hours of leading and directing projects, and 35 hours of project management education.  Alternatively, you can show that you have a four-year degree, along with 4,500 hours of leading and directing projects, and 35 hours of…

Why take the PMP Exam?

Why take the PMP Exam? Many people wonder why they should take the PMP® exam. What is the purpose, what will it do for you, and is it worth it?   There’s no doubt that preparing to take the PMP® exam is a journey. And, if you let it, this journey can help you expand yourself and your abilities.   In preparing for this exam, you will have an opportunity to become an even better project manager, so you’ll do much more than just prepare to pass a test. In fact, this opportunity to learn is one of the best reasons to get your PMP® certification.  Understanding Is the Key to Passing the Exam  The PMP® exam is an international exam designed to prove your knowledge and experience in applying the art and science of project management. It focuses on situations you might encounter in the real world, rather than just asking…

Is Your Lack of Risk Management Hurting You?

Is Your Lack of Risk Management Hurting You?

Risk management is, essentially, the process by which you identify and analyze the various risks that are associated with any project, no matter how large or small. This is important because it gives you the chance, during the planning process, to figure out what risks might end up affecting your project. That way, you can take steps to avoid those potential risks becoming a real problem. And, if those risks do become reality, you can immediately take action.

How to Create a Project Communication Plan

How to Create a Project Communication Plan

Creating a clear communication plan can help you effectively collaborate with your team, client, and stakeholders. Like other tools that you’ll use for the duration of a project, this plan will set straightforward guidelines that everyone will follow to stay on the same page as they work on meeting goals.

What’s a Project Communication Plan?

This plan outlines the methods that will be used to share information (think: meetings, emails, phone calls, status reports, discussion boards, etc.). And it also covers when information will be shared, who will be sharing it, and who will be receiving it. Plus, it gives everyone the opportunity to provide critical feedback that can help ensure a project’s success.

How to Combat Project Scope Creep

Scope creep happens when a project’s scope is changed or additional requirements are implemented after the start of a project, and you don’t really have any control over it. Although you know that changes are likely to occur at some point during any project, the lack of control that comes with scope creep can be very stressful.

More specifically, scope creep occurs when changes to a project haven’t been authorized, and when the effects of those changes haven’t been addressed. Worse yet, you’re still required to achieve the project’s goals with the same schedule, budget, and resources that you had before the changes were made.

All of this might mean that you’re unable to meet the original authorized aspects of your project on time, and it might cause the project to fail unless you know how to tackle scope creep.

Manager vs. Leader: Which Are You?

As a professional in project management, you don’t only manage projects, you also lead teams. So, being able to work as both a manager and a leader can help you excel and really stand out in the workplace.

It’s worth taking some time to uncover the things that differentiate a manager from a leader. After all, some people who are leaders might not make the best managers, and vice versa. But if you’re determined to be both, you can hone your skills to manage and lead more effectively.

Take a look at the information below on managers vs. leaders to figure out which one you are, and to gain a clearer picture of what you might need to do to advance your career.

10 Common Risk Mistakes to Avoid – Part 1

project risk10 Common Risk Mistakes to Avoid on Projects, Part One

Do you want to control your projects instead of having them control you? One of the main ways to do that is by strategically managing risk. But if you aren’t taking the right approach to risk management, you won’t be taking full advantage of what this technique has to offer, and you might even end up doing more harm than good. So, to help you along, we’ve compiled a list of 10 common risk mistakes that you should aim to avoid on every project.

To get started, and to help you improve your risk management strategy, here’s a list of five of the ten common risk management mistakes, along with Tricks of the Trade® on how to avoid them.

10 Common Risk Mistakes to Avoid on Projects – Part 2

This is the second part of our guide to 10 of the most common risk mistakes that you should try your best to avoid on projects.

Before moving forward, be sure to read the first 5 Common Risk Mistakes to Avoid on Projects – Part One. Then, when you’re ready, check out the remaining five mistakes that can hinder your ability to tackle a project successfully, along with tips that will help you manage risk more effectively.

Handling Unrealistic Schedules

So, you have been given a project completion date from management or the customer that you think is unrealistic. Did you know that this is the project manager’s fault? Yes, I mean that. An unrealistic schedule only happens if a project manager is not using the tools of project management properly. Here is how to handle this situation once and for all.

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