President and CEO of RMC Learning Solutions
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Tim Mulcahy

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Tim Mulcahy is the President an Chief Executive Officer of RMC Learning Solutions, Inc. He has held that position for over eight years. Prior to becoming President of RMC he was the company’s general counsel. Before becoming involve with RMC Tim was a practicing lawyer whose practice emphasize contract and commercial law.

Why a Clear Definition of a Program is Necessary for PMIAA

The Program Management Improvement and Accountability Act of 2015 (PMIAA) was intended to create a uniform set of standards and guidelines for implementing programs within the federal government. PMIAA also mandated the creation of a career path for program managers. On its face, PMIAA sounds like a great idea, but there may be complications that keep it from achieving the goals sought by Congress. One issue is that PMIAA fails to clearly define a “program.”

What You Need to Know about Upcoming Changes to Rita Mulcahy’s™ PMP® Exam Prep Book

It’s that time again. The Project Management Institute® (PMI) has updated their book A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide). This occurs every four years. It’s PMI’s way of keeping the book current with today’s project management practices. For RMC it means that all of our books, software, and classes have to be revised to stay in alignment with the PMBOK® Guide-Sixth Edition. It also provides us with the opportunity to make other changes to our products and courses so we can deliver the best possible learning experiences. And we are hard at it. RMC’s flagship product, Rita Mulcahy’s™ PMP® Exam Prep book, is currently undergoing extensive changes. Many are driven by updates found within the PMBOK® Guide-Sixth Edition, while others are made to improve the learning experience and incorporate feedback from our readers and students. We also utilize in-house knowledge gained after the publication of…

What Good Are Certifications, Anyway?

It seems that certifications are under attack.  In the past several months I’ve heard that corporations are no longer interested in having their employees obtain any certifications.   This rant is not limited to the PMP®.  Indeed, it is said that companies are now solely interested in skills training. On one level this makes sense.  Why should a company care whether their employees are certified project managers, business analysts or Scrum Masters so long as they are able to perform those functions? What good are certifications, anyway?

Leadership without Authority

I’m reading “Leadership and the One Minute Manager,” by Ken Blanchard. The book discusses “situational leadership,” which essentially means that a manager’s leadership style must vary depending on the competency of the person being managed.   As I was reading the book I realized that these management styles, while probably relevant, would not initially apply to most project managers.

Agile vs Waterfall (A PM Fairy-tale)

A PMP® and a Scrum Master® were having lunch together on a park bench debating the relative merits of Agile as opposed to traditional waterfall project management.  They were making the arguments one would normally expect. At one point, the traditional PMP felt the need to prove his devotion to his profession by pulling out his wallet to show the Scrum Master his PMI membership card.  As luck would have it, a thief was passing  by and, seeing his opportunity, snatched the wallet and ran off.

The Benefits of PMP® Revisited

Over the years there has been quite a lot written about the benefits of the PMP® Certification.  There has also been some comment (mostly anecdotal on blogs) about some of the disadvantages.

According to several studies, the benefits include:

Contract Issues in Agile Development

Apparent Conflict

There has been a significant amount of discussion regarding the tension between development and agile contracts. Many see this conflict as irreconcilable, citing provisions in the Agile Manifesto favoring “working software over comprehensive documentation” and “customer collaboration over contract negotiation.”   

Those who see the conflict this way claim that lawyers are operating in an outmoded mindset and need to be educated about the agile method of doing business. These same people claim that lawyers perceive many agile practitioners as unrealistic and naive.           

In my view, this so-called tension is the result of a misconception of the lawyer’s role and of his or her duty to the client.  

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