Rita Mulcahy's Original Exam Prep ™

Leadership

Agile Approaches in agile projects

This post is a follow-up to my Agile DNA webinar I hosted a little over a month ago. This was my first webinar for RMC and we had a great interest with over 2,000 people registering for the event interested in Agile approaches in agile projects. The recording is now available, see below for details on how to access it. The webinar was entitled “Agile DNA, the People and Process Elements of Successful Agile Projects” and the DNA theme came from the twin strands of People and Process guidance that run through all agile approaches in agile projects and make agile uniquely what it is.

5 Reasons to Care about Project Communication

Project CommunicationProject managers spend 90 percent of their time on communication related activities; yet communication is reported to be the No. 1 problem on projects.

Consider the following example: While planning one of my projects, my core project team assessed our sponsor, “William”, to have high influence but low interest in our project. William would routinely arrive late to meetings, be distracted by his phone, and leave early saying he had more important meetings to attend. When he was present, his gloomy attitude affected the rest of the team. They did not want to speak up in front of him fearing that they may have to face his disdain.

Aggressive Transparency

aggressive transparency I came across a new phrase last week, which I really like:  “aggressive transparency”. I saw this phrase in the Project Management Institute, Inc. exposure draft of A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK® Guide) – Sixth Edition.  It is used in the Project Stakeholder Management chapter referring to the fact that agile approaches strive to be very transparent so that stakeholders always are aware of project progress.  I liked the phrase and searched on it to see if I could find where it originated.

Death by a Thousand “Little Mistakes”

Paying attention to the details is good business analysis

How many little mistakes do you see?
I open the newspaper in the morning and see a typo. I open my email and see a grammatical error. I go to a web site and a menu button doesn’t work. How many “little mistakes” do you see in a day? Corporations are pushing employees to work faster and get products to market sooner. Is this agile or is this sloppy? Many companies sacrifice analysis and attention to detail to increase revenue but it won’t pay off in the long run.

Customer Service, Please

“For English, please say or press 1,” so you press 1. The friendly automated voice says, “I am sorry. I did not get that. What would you like to do?” So you say  “1.” The friendly voice then asks, “Did you say ‘1’? Press or say 1 for yes, and 2 for no.” So you say, “Customer service.” The voice replies right back with, “Okay, I will transfer you to a representative, BUT first, please tell me the reason for your call,” followed by a list of options that are not relevant to your call. Here, then, are your options, and not one of them is what you need, so you repeat “customer service” and she repeats the same list. By this point, five minutes have passed and you don’t even have a spot in the customer service center queue.
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